“U:L:O: 2019” Exhibition

Interstate Projects

poster for “U:L:O: 2019” Exhibition
Bookmark this event [0]
Recommend this event [0]

 

Ends in 11 days
Closed Today (Wednesday)

U:L:O: is a curatorial program that invites three curators over a four week period to organize a show in one of the three spaces at Interstate Projects.

U:L:O: 2019 | U: Museum Gallery
Number 36: If A Child Set the World On Fire Would They Do It Like This Or Like This

Edwin Bethea, Raque Ford, Cody Goebl, Dance Lawyer, Vijay Masharani, Liv Mendez, Carlos Reyes, Margaret Roman, Audrey Ryan, Matthew Tully Dugan, Aine Vonnegut

Things are, wrong here,
Or at least different now, space seems different now.
Time feels heavier somehow and it’s leaning on its siamese twin,
I can tell, they’re hurting
Seeing these two titans so distraught makes you wince
Like watching your dad trip on the sidewalk
Something comforts you about it though
But then we’re back to where we were
And seeing something so bossy and rigid
Unpacked and floating
Makes its power all the more crushing now
I can’t compete
A curiosity sits in the center of the room.
Multiple bodies converge around it,
Protecting, but also coveting.
Their movements are understood there is no need for messy communication.
A fish is caught out of the corner of your eye, then so are you.
A familiar rabbit rests nearby
They haven’t aged as well as you
A vessel filled with nothing showers
New York’s finest, celebrities.
Chains dance in the sky above your head
Five,
Six,
Seven,
Eight, going up
We press all the buttons on this elevator,
Put a tag on air
And keep looking up.
If I stand right there, I can hear God I swear.
He can’t hear me,
But I can hear him.
A world in a can
A soul stuck in a solid place.

Museum Gallery, Brooklyn, NY – museumgallery.co


–––—

U:L:O: 2019 | L: Calaboose
Red Sky at Morning

Marlon Kroll
Catherine Telford Keogh
Joani Tremblay


Calaboose is pleased to present Red Sky at Morning, featuring the work of Marlon Kroll (Montreal, Quebec), Catherine Telford Keogh (Toronto, Ontario), and Joani Tremblay (Montreal, Quebec). Referencing an age-old maritime rhyme, the exhibition offers a speculative meditation on the evolving relationship between humans and water in the wake of climate change. As rising sea levels become an increasing threat to New York City, Red Sky at Morning is a premonition; a near future where neighborhoods submerge as tides ebb and flow over basketball courts, apartment complexes, and bookshops.

Kroll’s interest in cyclical systems and hydrophobia emerge in new illustration, sound, and sculpture. Air conditioning fans can be heard in the stairwell, a cold descent into Interstate’s basement project space. Fans are also found in Climate Control (2019) depicting a fictitious geoengineering project designed to lower the Earth’s temperature by evaporating water at a cosmic scale. Rendered here as science fiction, Climate Control mimics real-life “solutions” to climate change currently under development.

Telford Keogh’s sculptures sit on the gallery floor as cross-sections of capitalist ruin. Dill pickles, Q-tips, hot peppers and Dial soap, among other items, are suspended in engorged pools, reflecting accelerated habits of consumption and disposal. On the West wall, layers of images and text are tinted by chemical detergents. Encased, these everyday objects become relics of another epoch. Equally confined, Demeter XAquaBrickX (2019), houses Kroger® Red Delicious Apple scaffolds cut into alphabet letters containing MCF-7 mammary cancer cells transfected with jellyfish DNA, drawing our sensitivities towards the development of new chimeric-chthonic entities at the micro level.

Layering deep oceanic and cold concrete tones, Tremblay’s works of oil on linen trace an unsettling harmony between the manufactured and the natural. As these material worlds collide, new and polluted landscapes emerge where labels and styrofoam packaging coexist with mutating flora, fossils, and frogs. Her paintings forecast the developing textures of plant and animal species as they adapt to harsh meteorological changes.

Calaboose (Montreal, Canada) – Calaboose is a nomadic curatorial project by artist Garrett Lockhart and writer Danica Pinteric. Presently in a converted carriage house in Montreal, Quebec, Calaboose has mounted exhibitions, offsites, and special projects since its formation in late 2017. In the Fall of 2019, Calaboose will relocate to Amsterdam and continue mounting exhibitions somewhere along the Dutch countryside.

–––—

U:L:O: 2019 | O: Sinkhole Project
Bar Art

Phoebe Franklin
Marc Matchak
Iain Mcdavid
Fence by Mario Miron
and friends of the hole


The first image I see when I wake up
Kim Kardashian falling asleep
in the water on ecstasy
suspended by buoys
Pills for sleeping while waking
O god of the stagnant water
I’m a spiritual kindergartener
I confess
I’ve learned to worship the lies
you’ve loved the best
My dewy other self in an
abundant orange grove
I wrote…
What I meant was…
I’m relaxing into my decay
in chemical colors
A toxic miasma glides
up the coast
masked finfoots and sooty albatross
meadows unmurmuring
Green marzipan raspberry jam
garish insects glisten in my palm
Making afterlife notes for my ancestors
I tear me to slivers
then bring them back to life

-Zoe Brezsny

Sinkhole Project, Baltimore MD – Sinkhole Project is a curatorial exercise by Joe W. Speier which treats a fence in Baltimore, MD (and sometimes elsewhere) as a physical pintrest board for works of art.

Media

Schedule

from July 05, 2019 to July 28, 2019

Opening Reception on 2019-07-05 from 18:00 to 21:00

Website

http://www.interstateprojects.com/ (venue's website)

Fee

Free

Venue Hours

From 12:00 To 18:00
Closed on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays
Note:Also by appointment.

Access

Address: 66 Knickerbocker Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11237

Between Grattan St and Harrison Pl., Subway: L to Morgan Avenue.

Google map

When you visit, why not mention you found this venue on New York Art Beat?

  • Facebook

    Reviews

    All content on this site is © their respective owner(s).
    New York Art Beat (2008) - About - Contact - Privacy - Terms of Use