“Self-Interned, 1942: Noguchi in Poston War Relocation Center” Exhibition

The Noguchi Museum

Bookmark this event [0]
Recommend this event [0]

 

Ends in 109 days

February 19, 2017, marks the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, the notorious wartime directive that authorized the internment of Japanese citizens and American citizens of Japanese heritage living in the Western United States. This exhibition explores Noguchi’s extraordinary decision—despite being exempt from internment as a resident of New York—to enter the Poston War Relocation Center, in the Arizona desert, hoping to contribute something positive to this forcibly displaced community, to which he had never felt more connected. In Noguchi’s words, “Thus I willfully became part of humanity uprooted.”

Curated by Noguchi Museum Senior Curator Dakin Hart, Self-Interned, 1942 brings together about two dozen works from the Museum’s collection, dating from before, during, and after Noguchi’s time at Poston, along with a substantial selection of archival documents. Together these evoke this harrowing moment in the history of American democracy, while revealing the impact that his experience at Poston had on Noguchi’s art.

The exhibition opens with a roughly chronological installation of about a dozen sculptures dating from 1941, the year before Noguchi entered the camp, to 1944, the year after he returned to New York City. Together, these trace the development of his work during the crucial period when he made the transition from his early figurative work to the modernist style for which he became known. Later works in this section show Noguchi exploring working in wood, one of the few materials that was both readily available and workable with limited equipment. Other works show how, during the years immediately following his release from the camp, Noguchi vacillated between excoriating satire—as in This Tortured Earth (1942–43) and Yellow Landscape (1943), the latter of which implicates the entire planet in the toxic anti-Asian stereotyping that swept the United States following December 7, 1941—and such consolatory subjects as Mother and Child, a simple, near-abstract work in onyx from the last years of the war—but before August 6, 1945.

The exhibition concludes with “Gateways,” and “Deserts,” side-by-side displays of works dating from the mid-fifties to mid-eighties that testify to the enduring impact of Noguchi’s experience as a wartime internee. “Gateways” comprises about six of the artist’s signature voids, doorways, and donut-shaped suns: literal and psychological portals that he hoped would offer transport to alternative perspectives and other states of mind.

“Deserts” examines the ways that the fundamental qualities of the desert landscape—stripped down, flat, and deceptively simple—became integral to landscape references in Noguchi’s art. Works such as Cactus Wind (1982–83), for example, show him working low to the ground in an ascetic, wind-and-sand-scoured mode that is near impossible not to understand as relating to a state of mind; while Double Red Mountain (1969), a table sculpture in Persian travertine, demonstrates his talent for essentializing the way the desert isolates and de-scales its major physical features, an approach that became a blueprint for Noguchi’s later microcosmic landscapes.

Public Program

On the Day of Remembrance, February 19, 2017, the Museum will offer free admission all day. At 3 pm, artist Kimi Maeda will present her solo performance, Bend.

Media

Schedule

from January 18, 2017 to January 07, 2018

Artist(s)

Isamu Noguchi

Website

http://www.noguchi.org (venue's website)

Fee

Adults $10, Seniors and Students $5, Members, New York City public high school students and Children under 12 Free, First Friday of the month Pay What You Wish

Venue Hours

From 10:00 To 17:00
saturdays opening at 11:00, sundays opening at 11:00, saturdays closing at 18:00, sundays closing at 18:00
Closed on Mondays, Tuesdays, Holidays

Access

Address: 9-01 33rd Road, Long Island City, NY 11106
Phone: 646-486-7050 Fax: 646-486-3731

Corner of Vernon Boulevard. Subway: N/W to Broadway(Queens)

Google map

When you visit, why not mention you found this venue on New York Art Beat?

  • Facebook

    Reviews

    All content on this site is © their respective owner(s).
    New York Art Beat (2008) - About - Contact - Privacy - Terms of Use