Joel Meyerowitz “Between the Dog and the Wolf”

Howard Greenberg Gallery

poster for Joel Meyerowitz “Between the Dog and the Wolf”
[Image: Joel Meyerowitz "Provincetown, Massachusetts" (1977) Copyright Joel Meyerowitz, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery]
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Ends in 28 days

An exhibition of photographs by Joel Meyerowitz from the 1970s and ‘80s will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery. Joel Meyerowitz: Between the Dog and the Wolf presents images made in those slightly mysterious moments around dusk. Much of the work is on public view for the first time. A new book, Joel Meyerowitz: Where I Find Myself: A Lifetime Retrospective, will be published in January 2018 by Laurence King.

The exhibition title Between the Dog and the Wolf is a translation of a common French expression “Entre chien et loup,” which describes oncoming twilight. As Meyerowitz notes, “It seemed to me that the French liken the twilight to the notion of the tame and the savage, the known and the unknown, where that special moment of the fading of the light offers us an entrance into the place where our senses might fail us slightly, making us vulnerable to the vagaries of our imagination.”

Most of the photographs in the exhibition are from a time when Meyerowitz was spending summers on Cape Cod and had just begun working with an 8x10 view camera. “My whole way of seeing was both challenged and refreshed. I found that time became a greater element in my work. The view camera demands longer exposures, and I began looking into the oncoming twilight and seeing things that the small cameras either couldn’t handle or didn’t present in significant enough quality,” Meyerowitz explains. “What seems of more value to me now, 30 years later, is how that devotion to the questions back then taught me to see in a new and simpler way.”

Photographs from the time of Meyerowitz’s iconic series Cape Light, widely recognized for his use of color and appreciation of light, are included in the exhibition. A young woman is perched on a wall that overlooks the Cape Cod Bay in a 1984 print, with the last of the daylight fading into a pink haze. A 1977 view of a dark house with one lit window has a sandy front yard with a sagging badminton net, an abandoned tricycle, and a blue doghouse with peeling paint. In a nearly abstract image from 1984, the viewer can barely see lights from a house on the beach as night falls. Other locations show a view of a serene sky with St. Louis’ Gateway Arch from 1977 and a palm tree in fading blue light in Florida from 1979.

As Meyerowitz notes, “I am grateful that my experience has allowed me to work both as a street photographer and as a view-camera photographer, and that I’m comfortable with both vocabularies. I speak two languages, classical and jazz. Street photography is jazz. The view camera, being so much slower, is more classical, more meditative, it has a different way of showing its content. You can be a jazz musician and play classically, and you can be a classical musician and love the immediacy and improvisation of jazz.”

Joel Meyerowitz (born 1938) is an award-winning photographer whose work has appeared in over 350 exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world. After a chance encounter with Robert Frank, the New York native began photographing street scenes in color in 1962, and by the mid-1960s became an early advocate of color photography and was instrumental in the legitimization and growing acceptance of color film. His first book, Cape Light (1979) is considered a classic work of color photography and has sold more than 100,000 copies. He has authored 17 other books, including Legacy: The Preservation of Wilderness in New York City Parks (Aperture, 2009). As the only photographer given official access to Ground Zero in the wake of September 11th, he created the World Trade Center Archive, selections of which have toured around the world. Meyerowitz is a two-time Guggenheim fellow and a recipient of awards from both the NEA and NEH. He is a recent winner of the Royal Photographic Society’s Centenary Award, its highest honor. For his 50 years of work in 2012, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Lucie Awards, an annual event honoring the greatest achievements in photography. His work is held in the collections of many museums, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; and the Museum of Fine Art, Boston. Meyerowitz lives and works in Tuscany and New York City.

Media

Schedule

from September 07, 2017 to October 21, 2017

Opening Reception on 2017-09-07 from 18:00 to 20:00

Artist(s)

Joel Meyerowitz

Website

http://www.howardgreenberg.com (venue's website)

Fee

Free

Venue Hours

From 11:00 To 18:00
Closed on Mondays, Sundays

Access

Address: 41 E 57th St., New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212-334-0010 Fax: 212-941-7479

Corner of Madison Ave. Subway: N/R/W to 5th Avenue or 4/5/6 to 59th Street or E/V to 5th Avenue/53rd Street

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